How much does a kitchen sink weigh? (typical examples)

Kitchen Sink Photo

If you have ever done any home renovations, you know there are many factors to consider when deciding on appliances. From aesthetics to price to size, we have all heard the horror stories of regret and buyers remorse. I recently heard a story of someone who spent thousands of dollars on a bed only to realize the box spring wouldn’t fit through the bedroom door. Then there was the incident of a friend whose brand new stainless refrigerator DID fit through the door but only barely. It now sports a large scratch on the front as a cruel reminder of the struggle to install it. Ouch! 

Truly, caution should be taken and all aspects considered when making a purchase especially when you will be living with the item for an extended period of time, and most certainly when investing in your home. 

Take kitchen sinks, for example. 

There are many topics to consider on your quest for the right sink, not the least of which is material and style. However, perhaps a less common factor, but one that deserves your consideration nonetheless is the weight of a kitchen sink. 

Many Choices

As we have detailed in previous articles there are many different kinds of sinks all with pros and cons, and the answer to the question of weight depends on which sink you choose. 

Let's start with stainless steel.

Stainless Steel

Even with the lower gauge stainless steel, these classic utilitarian sinks can vary anywhere from 25 lbs to 55 lbs. Obviously, size is a factor here as well. Stainless steel sinks are particularly versatile and come in many shapes and sizes hence the wide range of weights. 

Copper

Similarly, copper sinks come in varying gauges and sizes and many weights as well. If you are looking at a copper sink, it may be helpful to note that the standard weight of copper in cubic inches is 0.324 lbs. The rest is just math and I will leave you to it. 

Fireclay

Fireclay is one of the heaviest options on the market weighing anywhere from 150 lbs to 300 lbs. 

Cast Iron

Cast iron sinks are not quite as heavy but are nothing to sneeze at tipping the scales at 150 lbs.

Additional Considerations

You want to make sure that your countertop and underlying structure can support that kind of weight long after you have carried and lifted your sink into place. Often times, you will benefit from professional installation when dealing with larger kitchen sinks, especially the fireclay models. Sometimes peace of mind is worth the extra cost of hiring a professional. 

Conclusion

At the end of the day, as with so many things the choices are endless. After all, isn’t that part of the fun of home renovations; making your space uniquely yours?

After you find the material and style of sink you love, just be sure to do your research when it comes to the weight and what your countertops can accommodate. Err on the side of caution and speak with a contractor or kitchen design expert to put your mind at ease. 

Once you know for sure what your weight limitations are you can move onto the fun part of getting that sink installed and watching your kitchen take on a life all its own. 

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